Know Thy Self; Vol 2

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A Human Fairy Tale Named Black

Let’s talk about a fairy tale named black

This chapter just has a space is the place exploration vibe like a group of people must acquire what resources they have and return home. Discussing music and media themes talking of alienation and finding a solution for that which would eventually lead to returning home but the question is where is. Home what is the identity of it.

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Encounters of a Space Cadet

This series of collages are based on my interpretations of what I have been reading from Ytasha Womack’s Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasy Culture. In the introduction it describes what afrofuturism is and how and why the term was coined.

‘ “the actual term Afrofuturism was first used by critic Mark Dery in his 1994 essay “Black to the Future,” which examined why there were so few black science fiction writers at the time, given the genre’s inextricable links to the other and life on the margins.” – Ytasha Womack, Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasy Culture

The first chapter discusses aspects of the impact of afrofuturism and what it has paved the way for;

  • The Rise of the Black Geek (Pop Culture in regards to Sci-fi)
  • Cosplay Rules (Fandom of popular Sci-Fi and Fantasy Media)
  • Dawn of a New Era (Rise in popularity)
  • A Cyber Movement being born (posthuman aspects of the Music and Media themes)
  • The Mother Ship lands on a historical black college (escapism and alienation)

 

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What is Afro-Futurism?

‘Afro-futurism is an intersection of imagination, technology, the future and liberation. “I generally define Afro-futurism as a way of imagining possible futures through a black cultural lens’” says Ingrid LaFleur, an art curator and Afro-futurist. LaFleur presented for the independently organized TEDx Fort Greene Salon in Brooklyn, New York. “I see Afro-futurism as a way to encourage experimentation, re-imagine identities, and activate liberation.” ’ – Y Womack, Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture

Afrofuturism - Ytasha Womack Release Photo

Themes for Design and Thesis

For this project the themes that will be looked at I’m still working it out but it’s to do with Afro-futurism where I’ll be having a speculative Sci Fi look at the future. There are many interpretations of the future but it’s always based on the European and America view point and never really looking at what the future would look like from outside European and American view point.

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